Kitec Plumbing and the Windsor Home

http://www.kitecsettlement.com/kitecphotos.cfm http://www.kitecsettlement.com/index.cfm http://www.kitecsettlement.com/completingform.cfm Source: The Windsor Star – June 29, 2011 A family rocked by a $13,000 plumbing bill is warning people to beware of potentially faulty plumbing lurking behind the walls of homes built or renovated in the last two decades. Frank and Annette Cappellino built their dream home in LaSalle, near Windsor, Ont., about 10 years ago. Last fall, the Cappellinos came home to a flood in their basement. “Water was just spewing out like a waterfall,” said Frank Cappellino. “A pipe had totally burst.” Cappellino said after a home inspection by a plumbing distributor and a representative of the Canadian manufacturer IPEX, the rep told him the cause of the leak was defective pipes branded under the name Kitec — pipes that were running throughout the house. “He said he had to take a part of it back to his company to get it tested but indicated that if it was his pipe, basically he would have it replaced,” Cappellino said. The Cappellinos contacted the company to find out the testing results, but said they were told they couldn’t have a copy of the report because a class action lawsuit was underway. IPEX provided the Cappellinos with the name of the Windsor law firm leading the suit. Cappellino said they joined the legal fight shortly thereafter. On Tuesday, lawyers for IPEX Inc. and IPEX USA LLC announced they had reached an agreement in the lawsuit, and that a $125-million US settlement fund has been proposed. Product used extensively Another family, whose home was built the same year as the Cappellinos, also ended up replacing all the pipes in their home at their own expense, after finding issues with their Kitec pipes, manufactured by IPEX. Plumbers in the region have been getting more and more calls about the Kitec brand of pipe, also known as PEX. According to Kyle Fowler, co-owner of Fowler Plumbing in Windsor, if you built or remodelled your home in the last decade or so, it’s likely Kitec pipes were used. He said he gets at least one call a week that turns out to be Kitec-related, and he said the plumbing system was used in most of the newer subdivisions. “I even have some in my house,” Fowler said. “Because we didn’t know. We thought it was good.” Cappellino shows the Kitec hot water pipe that burst last fall. Karen Brady/CBCThe Kitec plumbing system consists of blue and orange flexible piping and brass fittings, used to carry cold and hot water through a home. Kitec products were also used in radiant heating systems. The pipes were made from polyethylene and a thin inner layer of aluminum, and plumbers considered them to be...

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Avoid Basement Flooding Windsor Real Estate

Avoiding Basement Flooding Basement flooding is unfortunately a common occurrence in many parts of Canada. But the good news is that many types of basement flooding may be avoided. This publication explains some of the practical steps you can take to avoid basement flooding. How Serious Is Basement Flooding? Basement flooding is now being recognized as a potentially serious problem. There are many negative consequences associated with basement flooding, above and beyond the inconvenient mess and disruption of household routine. Research cites the following impacts: Chronically wet houses are linked to an increase in respiratory problems. Frequent occurrences of basement flooding can result in long-term damage to the building and equipment that may not be covered by insurance. Insurance rates may rise to compensate for repeated basement flooding claims, and/or the minimum deductible may be increased significantly. Property value may depreciate because the basement is prone to frequent flooding. Before appropriate measures can be taken, it is important to identify the causes of basement flooding. These range from problems originating in the individual dwelling to problems associated with the municipal sewer systems that serve entire communities. Why Do Basements Flood? Water can enter your basement for a number of reasons. Water in your basement is most likely to occur during periods of heavy rainfall, or when snow is melting rapidly during a spring thaw. In these cases, your basement can be wet because of: a leak or crack in your home’s basement walls; poor lot drainage; failure of the weeping tiles (foundation drains); and overflowing eavestroughs or leaking/plugged downspouts. Basement flooding may also occur because of: a blocked connection between your home and the main sewer in the street; a back-up of wastewater in the sewer system (or a combination of wastewater and rainwater from the sanitary or combined sewer system); and failure of a sump pump (in some areas) used to pump weeping tile water. Basements are also vulnerable to natural river flooding disasters, but these cannot be addressed by individual homeowners. Flooding Basics Municipalities attempt to prevent flooding by maintaining the public sewer system. Homeowners with private sewage systems (septic tank and field bed) can appreciate the need for regular maintenance, but unforeseen or accidental problems can occur in any type of system. Here is some municipal infrastructure terminology you should know: Sanitary Sewer A sanitary sewer is a pipe buried beneath the street that is designed to transport wastewater from your home. This consists of water from sanitary fixtures (toilets, sinks, etc.) and floor drains inside your house, and in some areas includes groundwater from weeping tiles around the foundation of your home. Storm Sewer A storm sewer is a pipe buried beneath the street that...

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