Moving Checklist

Moving Checklist Use this handy checklist to plan and organize your moving activities. Print this page and post it on your fridge for easy reference. Remember to save your receipts. Some moving expenses may be tax deductible.  One month before Start a moving expense book. Ask for references from at least two moving companies and get written estimates. Feel free to call me for references to companies my clients have used in the past. Make sure the movers know all the items which are to be included. Do not include jewellery or other small valuables. Ask for a copy of the mover’s insurance and compare it with your existing coverage. Get a written commitment from the moving company that specifies the date of the move and arrival. Contact the provincial health authorities for the province you are moving out of and the one you are moving into. If moving within the same province notify them of your change of address. Resign from any clubs or organizations that are not active in your new community. Cancel newspaper and magazine subscriptions or change address. Contact your bank to arrange the transfer of accounts and loans if required. Order cheques with new address. Register your change of address with the post office, and obtain a supply of change of address cards. Begin mailing your change of address cards. Keep a list of cards sent. Don’t forget to notify all credit card companies. Gather all important documents including your pets’. Two weeks before Clean out club and school lockers. Arrange for the change over of utilities. Take measurements of the new house. Make a floor plan and decide where everything will go. Don’t guess. Book freight elevator if you are moving out of an apartment. Start packing. Number and mark contents of boxes. Keep an inventory list and make two copies for each box. Keep one with your inventory list and put the other inside each box. Seal boxes. Return all borrowed items and collect what you’ve loaned. One week before List all of the items you want to take with you personally. Include all valuable items which should not be entrusted to movers. Dismantle and/or fasten anything that requires it. Prepare a list of everything else that is left. Confirm the booking for the freight elevator. Confirm the booking for the moving company. Defrost and air-dry the deep freezer. Two days before The last day to pack! Double check location of valuables and important papers. If you are taking the appliances, remember to disconnect, defrost, and air-dry the fridge and freezer. Do your last laundry. Disconnect and drain the washing machine if you are taking it with you. Protect delicate furniture with...

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Do Your Homework When Choosing a Mover – Windsor Essex Real Estate

Do your homework when choosing a mover For some consumers, the most daunting aspect of the buying or selling process is the move itself. Moving is not only labour-intensive, but it can also unleash a range of emotions at a difficult time. If the catalyst for the move is a family death, divorce or other major lifestyle change, a bad moving experience can rub salt in the wound, aggravating an already challenging situation. Many resources are available to determine whether a mover is reputable. The Canadian Association of Movers (CAM), the Better Business Bureau, and any of the major national van lines (such as Allied, Atlas, Mayflower, North American or United) are all good sources. Also check out the Consumer Beware page through the Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services for movers to avoid. One of the best tips is to place more weight on reputation than price, says John Levi, president of CAM. With about 350 members across the country, CAM represents Canada’s largest moving companies, many small to mid-sized movers, national van lines, suppliers and many international movers. It also works with government agencies to represent member issues and with consumers to provide referrals and assist with complaints. “Many people don’t realize that their prime concern should be a having a good moving experience, not getting the cheapest price,” says Levi, who has been with CAM for 16 years. “The lowest quoted price does not actually guarantee the lowest cost or a good-quality job, he advises. Consider the value of your possessions as well as the potential cost of loss, damage, tardiness or claims, he says. All of those factors should be weighed to determine the move’s total price tag, and doing some homework before selecting a mover is well worth the time. Because the moving industry is largely unregulated, Levi warns that choosing a reputable mover is vital in avoiding problems. His organization receives about 150 complaints a year about movers. The most common complaints pertain to overcharging, lateness, damage or loss, but issues also arise with inexperienced crews, poor communication, and failed promises. To join CAM, a mover must be in business for more than a year, be reputable, and undergo a due diligence and verification process. The association checks out companies through the Better Business Bureau and asks other members to offer a fair opinion on potential members. Loss or damage claims can end up being drawn out for years, says Levi. Consumers who take steps to do some preliminary research usually avoid claims, he adds. Many problems are preventable. A good mover should be prepared to answer questions and provide clear expectations about the move for the individual or family. Consumers can spare themselves...

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