Mortgage Loan Insurance Windsor Real Estate

What is CMHC Mortgage Loan Insurance? Mortgage loan insurance is typically required by lenders when homebuyers make a down payment of less than 20% of the purchase price. Mortgage loan insurance helps protect lenders against mortgage default, and enables consumers to purchase homes with a minimum down payment of 5% — with interest rates comparable to those with a 20% down payment. To obtain mortgage loan insurance, lenders pay an insurance premium. Typically, your lender will pass this cost on to you. The premium payable is based on a percentage of the home’s purchase price that is financed by a mortgage. The premium can be paid in a single lump sum or it can be added to your mortgage and included in your monthly payments. Mortgage loan insurance is not to be confused with mortgage life insurance which guarantees that your remaining mortgage at the time of your death will not be a burden to your...

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Removing Ice on Roofs

Removing Ice on Roofs The 1998 Ice Storm The ice storm that hit eastern Canada in January, 1998 was a laboratory for concentrated research into severe ice accumulation on roofs. Removing ice on roofs describes some of the techniques developed from the research for dealing with extensive roof icing and ice dam problems. Please note: Some of these techniques are for skilled tradespeople only. No ice problem on your roof is serious enough to risk broken bones — or worse. The balance between removing ice and damaging the roof Thick ice is hard to remove.You must decide if trying to remove it will cause more damage than leaving it on the roof. Tools, such as hammers, shovels, scrapers, chain saws, and devices such as shoes with ice spikes can damage roofing materials or the structure below. Chemical de-icers can discolor shingles, break down membranes and corrode flashings and drains. De-icers can also damage plants on the ground. What to do in an ice storm emergency First: Observe and evaluate the situation every day. Is the ice causing a structural problem? Is there water damage? Do you have to do anything? Second: Evaluate your capabilities and limits. Do you have the equipment, the agility and the help to work safely and efficiently? If you don’t, get professional help before the situation becomes urgent. Third: To prevent damage, do as little as possible.Total clearing has the greatest potential for damage to the roof and to people and property below. Often, clearing dangerous overhangs and icicles and making drainage paths is enough. Recommended Procedures for Sloped Roofs When is there a problem? The lower the slope, the greater the weight problem. During the ‘98 ice storm many flat roofs had 15 cm (6 in.) of solid ice, while most sloped roofs had little more than 5 cm (2 in.). Most of the ice collected at roof junctions, behind obstructions such as chimneys or skylights, and at roof edges. Drainage, not removal, solved the problem in most cases. The information in Signs of Stress will help you decide if weight is causing problems on your roof. If your house doesn’t show signs of stress, then there is no need to remove all the ice. Drainage On a sloped roof, your goal is to make drainage paths through the ice on the lower edge of the roof. That’s where most ice dam and water back-up problems occur. Always shovel off loose snow to expose the ice. If you have power and electric heating cables, making drainage paths is fairly easy. Attach loops of electrical roof de-icing cables to one or more long boards. With ropes tied to the board and thrown over the roof,...

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BUCKINGHAM REALTY (WINDSOR) LTD. MARKET WATCH

Compliments of http://www.cameronpaine.com/ BUCKINGHAM REALTY (WINDSOR) LTD. MARKET WATCH Windsor-Essex County Residential Market For the Period Ending December 31, 2011   During the period ending December 31, 2011 there were 4,786 residential sales in the market place this compares to 4,806 residential sales for the same period in 2010. As of December 31, 2011 there were 9,364 residential listings received this compares to 9,779 in the same period for 2010 and is a decrease of 4%. The sales to listings ratio (listings sold expressed as a percent of listings received) for the period was 51% in 2010 it was 49%. The inventory of the active residential listings as of December 31, 2011 was 2,450, this compares to 2,629 in 2010. This is a decrease of 7% in active residential listings. The average residential selling price was $169,972 for the period ending December 31, 2011. This is an increase of almost 4% from 2010. The average listing during the period took 76 days to sell (75 in 2010) and sold for 95% of the list price. For a similar report of statistics about condominiums sales, contact one of our sales representatives. Statistics are provided courtesy of the Windsor Esssex County Real Estate...

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Replacing Your Furnace Windsor Real Estate

Replacing Your Furnace There are usually two major reasons why you are choosing another forced-air furnace. The first is that your furnace does not function. It has just broken down, irrevocably, or it has been “red-tagged” or condemned by gas inspectors. If it is winter, and your house is getting colder quickly, you may not have the luxury of making a reasoned choice on what to buy next. The other situation is that your furnace is getting old, or your fuel bills are becoming too excessive to tolerate. In this case, you have the time to shop around and get the best furnace and fuel for your situation. This About Your House is written to address both situations. If you have a dead furnace and a chilly house, you will probably take some shortcuts in your selection process. Choice of Fuels For many years, CMHC and others could offer sound advice on what fuel choice would be the most economical. During that period, heating systems based on electricity or propane cost the most to operate. Heating oil was somewhat more economical, and natural gas (if available in your community) was the least expensive choice. Since 2000, the prices of these commodities have been fluctuating, and it is difficult to offer reliable advice on pricing. At one point in 2001 – 2002, heating with electricity in Manitoba was as economical as heating with natural gas. Predicting these prices over the next two decades (a common life span for a furnace) is nearly impossible. The best advice is to make a calculation based on the current prices quoted to you in your locality. See the text box entitled “Calculating fuel costs.” Calculating Fuel Costs Here is a rough comparison of the relative costs of heating an older house in Ottawa. You can put in your own fuel prices and the efficiencies of the appliance that you are choosing to compare relative costs. Note: It is often difficult to isolate the cost per unit of fuel, be it gas or electricity. Include all the costs that relate to the m³ of consumption forgas (for example, gas supply charge, gas delivery charges, gas surcharges). Electric utilities often also have a bewildering range of charges. Apply all the charges except fixed charges (for example, $10/month connection charge). For oil appliances, use an energy content of 38.2 MJ/litre of oil. For electricity, use 3.6 MJ/kWh and 100-per-cent efficiency. Note: 80 GJ (or 80 gigajoules) is the energy required for heating the example house over the winter (heat load). Your own house will likely be different. However, the relative costs calculated for alternative fuels and furnaces in the example house should help you make a selection...

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Your Furnace Filter Windsor Real Estate

Your Furnace Filter Compliments of www.cameronpaine.com What a Furnace Filter Can do for You Traditionally, furnace filters were designed to protect the furnace and fans. With increased air quality awareness, some filters are now being installed to reduce exposure to particles which can affect your health. There is a wide variety of furnace filters available. However, you may find it confusing to select one which is suitable. This purpose of this document is to provide you with guidance when selecting your furnace filter. What Airborne Particles are Found in Your Home? The particles you breathe in your home come from a variety of sources including: dust on floors or other surfaces that is disturbed by activity in the house dust generated by smoking, burning candles, cooking, doing laundry, etc. hair and skin flakes from humans or pets particles from the outside air which come into your home with infiltrating air Some particles are so small that they are inhaled and then exhaled without being trapped in your lungs. Some larger particles are trapped in your nose and throat and never reach your lungs. Still other particles are too large to be inhaled.The particles most dangerous to you are those that enter your lungs and lodge there. You can see the particles of dust which accumulate on your television screen, shelves, and furniture. But you can’t see the respirable particles. Respirable particles can be easily inhaled into your lungs and provoke respiratory illness. Although you would probably like to keep visible dust out of your home, the main health risk comes from respirable particles, which include tobacco smoke, spores, bacteria, and viruses. The activity levels of the people in your home can affect the air you breathe. Activity such as vacuuming and cooking can create or stir up particles. On the other hand, during periods of inactivity such as the middle of the night, particle concentrations tend to be much lower. Filter Research CMHC conducted a study to verify filter manufacturer claims and to determine whether good filters will significantly reduce your exposure to airborne particles. All results are compiled and discussed in the research report: Evaluation of Residential Furnace Filters (1999). You can obtain a copy of this report by calling the Canadian Housing Information Centre (CHIC) at 1 800 668-2642. A summary of the results of this study follows. Research Program The CMHC study first tested ten filter types in a single home and then the following filters in 5 additional homes: i) 25 mm (1″) premium media filter ii) Charged media type electronic iii) 100 mm (4″) pleated media filter iv) High efficiency bypass filters, such as a HEPA (high efficiency particle arrestor) v) Electronic plate and...

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Home Maintenance Schedule

Home Maintenance Schedule Regular Maintenance is the Key Inspecting your home on a regular basis and following good maintenance practices are the best way to protect your investment in your home. Whether you take care of a few tasks at a time or several all at once, it is important to get into the habit of doing them. Establish a routine for yourself, and you will find the work is easy to accomplish and not very time-consuming. A regular schedule of seasonal maintenance can put a stop to the most common — and costly — problems, before they occur. If necessary, use a camera to take pictures of anything you might want to share with an expert for advice or to monitor or remind you of a situation later. By following the information noted here, you will learn about protecting your investment and how to help keep your home a safe and healthy place to live. If you do not feel comfortable performing some of the home maintenance tasks listed below, or do not have the necessary equipment, for example a ladder, you may want to consider hiring a qualified handyperson to help you. Seasonal Home Maintenance Most home maintenance activities are seasonal. Fall is the time to get your home ready for the coming winter, which can be the most gruelling season for your home. During winter months, it is important to follow routine maintenance procedures, by checking your home carefully for any problems that may arise and taking corrective action as soon as possible. Spring is the time to assess winter damage, start repairs and prepare for warmer months. Over the summer, there are a number of indoor and outdoor maintenance tasks to look after, such as repairing walkways and steps, painting and checking your chimney and roof. While most maintenance is seasonal, there are some things you should do on a frequent basis year-round: Make sure air vents indoors and outdoors (intake, exhaust and forced air) are not blocked by snow or debris. Check and clean range hood filters on a monthly basis. Test ground fault circuit interrupter(s) on electrical outlets monthly by pushing the test button, which should then cause the reset button to pop up. If there are young children in the house, make sure electrical outlets are equipped with safety plugs. Regularly check the house for safety hazards, such as a loose handrail, lifting or buckling flooring, inoperative smoke detectors, and so on. Timing of the seasons varies not only from one area of Canada to another but also from year to year in a given area. For this reason, we have not identified the months for each season. The maintenance schedule presented...

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