Tips for Showing a Home Windsor Real Estate

6 Tips to a Great Home Showings When it comes to showing your home to potential home buyers, you want to make sure that they are focused on the home’s potential to become theirs rather than constantly distracting them with outside issues. The following tips will help showings . Home Showing Tip  #1 Dont have Family and friends just hanging out When you decide to sell your home, you really do need to consider how you will show your home. It is definitely unsettling for home buyers to walk through a home only to find that there are kids sleeping in the rooms or someone is frying up a steak as they arrive. A home showing must be treated like a business transaction and in order to drive a sale, you must behave in a professional manner. Ask family members to look after your kids and make sure that the only people in the home are the ones who will be showing it. Home Showing Tip #2 Being Present for Showings You have right to be excited about showing your home to potential hom buyers and you may want to gauge their opinion about your home. But  best if the home owner is not present during showings. If the home owner is home, people often feel rushed and do not give the home enough time. By letting the Realtor handle the showing, it gives the buyer time to look around and discuss the home with their Realtor. Home Showing Tip #3 Knowing  your homes strengths and weaknesses From the moment home buyers walk toward your home, they are searching for flaws and drawbacks, as most skeptics tend to do. I often find it helpful to do a summary of the strengths of a home and show the value of improvements, as well I can often do a cost analysis of any potential weaknesses ie. cost of a new roof or windows.  If a home needs a major repair, it will be obvious to any buyer. Having a quote before hand can often elimante any fears a buyer might have. Home Showing Tip # 4 Removing any Odours Nothing says “don’t buy my house” quite like the smell of wet dog. Add the smell of synthetic roses to the mix, and you might essentially be telling home buyers to run not walk away from your home. As well, cooking before or during a home visit is not appreciated, as no one wants to leave a home smelling like fried food. Boil some cinnamon in water and keep the scent of your home welcoming and delicate rather than invasive. Home Showing Tip #5 Temporary removing pets If possible Pets should not be presetn for showings. If...

Read More

Making a Room Feel Bigger – Windsor Essex Real Estate

Most of us can’t afford a home with massive rooms – not just because the square footage is costly, but also because it would cost an arm and a leg to keep that home heated and comfortable. There are, however, a vast array of tricks and methods that lend themselves to creating an illusion and will help you make a room feel bigger. That said, here are seven ways to make a room feel bigger: Ways to make a room feel bigger #1 Get Roman blinds Window treatment are an important part of making a room feel bigger and using roman blinds instead of curtains takes away that cluttered feeling and the look of extra and unwanted material draped over the living room floor, getting in your way and causing more problems than it’s worth. Ways to make a room feel bigger #2 Use color In terms of illusion, light colors will always make a room seem larger, so try and avoid darker colors when painting the walls, opting instead for a light shade of blue or white. This method will make rooms appear open and airy, and they are also naturally reflective colors, which leads me on to the next point. Ways to make a room feel bigger #3 Opt for natural lighting Letting natural light stream into the room will really open it up, making it feel larger. Make as much use of natural light as possible; add skylights, windows, anything that will open your house up. If this is not possible, then ensure the room is adequately lit as shadows can make a space seem smaller and cramped. Ways to make a room feel bigger #4 Hang mirrors Perhaps an odd choice, the use of mirrors is recommended by experts due to the way it gives the illusion of depth. Place it at a specific point in the room, angle it in a way that is going to ensure maximum depth and it will give you the illusion of more open flow. Like light colors, it can also reflect natural light, and helps brighten up a room. Ways to make a room feel bigger #5 Go for built-ins over closets Instead of moving each bit of furniture back against the wall, a built-in closet enables you to gain extra space and effectively move a lot of your junk out the way by placing it in the wall closet. The extra space built into the closet will have little effect on the size of the room, and means you are effectively not losing any space, but gaining more room to place decorations, mirrors, and anything else you might want. Ways to make a room feel bigger #6...

Read More

What to do when your assessment is too high, Windsor Real Estate

Source MPAC brochure: If you don’t agree with your Property Assessment from MPAC you can file a Request for Reconsideration. The deadline to file your RfR is April 2, 2012. There are two ways to file a RfR: • The preferred method is to submit a RfR form. Request For Reconsideration 2012 Form Forms are available at www.mpac.ca, or call us at 1 866 296-MPAC (6722). You may also choose to file your RfR electronically through AboutMyProperty™ on MPAC’s website. You will be able to attach documents, pictures and reports to accompany your RfR. Your personalized User ID and Password for AboutMyProperty™ are included on your Notice. 1. Write a letter requesting a reconsideration. In your letter, please include the 19-digit roll number on your Notice; your full name, address and phone number; and the reasons why you feel your assessment is not correct, including any information you have to support your claim. 2. File an Appeal with the Assessment Review Board (ARB) You may also choose to file an Appeal with the ARB, an independent tribunal of Ontario’s Ministry of theAttorney General. Residential, Farm and Managed Forest Properties If your property, or a portion of it, is classified as residential, farm or managed forests, you must first file a RfR with MPAC before you are eligible to file an Appeal with the ARB. The classification of your property is indicated on your Notice. If you are required to, or choose to file a RfR first, you have 90 days after MPAC has notified you of its decision on your RfR to file an Appeal with the ARB. The ARB has its own Appeal process. For more information, please contact the ARB at 1 866 448-2248 or 416 212-6349 or visit their website at www.arb.gov.on.ca. To request that your property be eligible for the farm or managed forests classes or conservation land exemption, you must file a RfR with the respective program administrator. For more information, please contact MPAC or visit www.mpac.ca. Other Property Types For any other property types, you can choose to file a RfR with MPAC or file an Appeal with the ARB. The deadline to file your RfR and/or Appeal is April 2, 2012. MPAC’s Role at an ARB Hearing At an ARB hearing, the onus is on MPAC to prove the accuracy of our assessed value. MPAC will present comparable properties as evidence and will share that information with you prior to the hearing. You will also be asked to provide evidence to support your position. Ideally, you should select properties that are most similar to yours (for example, neighbourhood, lot dimensions, living area, age of structure(s) and quality of construction). Please contact MPAC if...

Read More

Understanding Smart Meters – ENWIN

Smart Meters are Here As part of a provincial initiative to encourage energy conservation and help Ontario consumers manage their electricity costs, ENWIN is now installing Smart Meters throughout Windsor. The Ontario Energy Board (OEB) has directed energy providers, like ENWIN, to install Smart Meters in all Ontario homes and small businesses, encouraging the development of a province-wide “culture of conservation”. As Windsor’s energy provider, ENWIN is mandated to complete local Smart Meter installations by early 2011. Everything Stays the Same It is important for customers to realize that everything will remain the same, following your Smart Meter Installation: An ENWIN employee will still come to read the meter, EnWin bills will still look the same, and electricity charges will still be calculated in the same way as before. Eventually, the province is expected to switch over to a new rate structure called Time-of-Use (TOU) pricing. But for now, only the appearance of the meter will change. TOU Pricing is NOT in Effect Smart Meters are here, but Time of Use Pricing isn’t. Not yet. You will not automatically move to time-of-use rates once your smart meter has been installed. Provincial legislation requires ENWIN to install Smart Meters as one step towards conserving energy and building for the future. Smart Meters will be installed this fall – but that will NOT have an immediate impact on how you are billed for your electricity. ENWIN customers will be billed differently ONLY after the Province requires us to move to Time of Use billing – likely some time in 2012. When a firm date is set, ENWIN will contact customers directly, and make sure you have all the information you need to benefit from the change. At the present time you will not notice any difference in your billing. ENWIN Respects and Protects Your Privacy As we move forward with Smart Meter installations, remember that Time of Use pricing is not yet in effect. In the future, when the Province requires ENWIN to move to this new system, Smart Meters will help customers reduce their energy costs by offering clear information about much energy is used at specific times of day. How and why you consume energy will remain, as always, private. ENWIN will ensure you are aware of all changes before they occur, and we thank you for helping Ontario build a brighter future. Quick, Efficient Installation Installation only takes a few minutes. A representative from ENWIN’s contractor, Olameter, will knock on your door to inform you that they are there to install your smart meter. Your power will be interrupted briefly, while the old meter is exchanged for a new Smart Meter. If you are not home, the representative...

Read More

New Home Buyer Tarion Protection

New Home Buyers Page Content If you’re considering purchasing a new home, congratulations! It’s an exciting and rewarding process. A new home may also be the most significant purchase you ever make. In addition to the financial commitment, there are a number of lifestyle and home design options you may need to consider. That’s why it’s so important to do your homework and gather as much information as possible about your potential new home before you sign the Agreement of Purchase and Sale. To help prepare you for your purchase, we’ve created Top Ten Tips for New Home Buyers. It’s a step-by-step list that provides research ideas, financial and legal resources, as well as practical maintenance advice. Together these tips will go a long way to ensuring that you’re very happy with your new home. Tarion provides important protection before and after your new home purchase When you buy a new home or condominium in Ontario, you enjoy the benefits of a comprehensive builder warranty. To learn more about this warranty, you can preview or print a copy of our concise, easy-to-read brochure entitled “Warranty Coverage for New Homes in Ontario“. You can also order a copy of this brochure. Your new home warranty begins before you even move in. Once you provide the down payment for your new home, it’s protected. You also have a right to compensation if your builder delays the closing of the sale without giving you proper notice. See Understanding Deposit Protection and Understanding Delayed Closings and Occupancies to learn more. Before you take possession of your new home or condominium, your builder will walk you through a pre-delivery inspection (PDI). Tarion provides a PDI Checklist to help you ensure that this critical inspection is thorough and complete. After moving in, you’re entitled to a 1 Year, 2 Year and 7 Year warranty against defects in work and materials. This warranty comes with certain obligations, so it’s important to understand the statutory warranty process. Protecting your new home warranty also requires that you properly manage the systems in your new home. Tarion offers tips on Maintaining Your Home to help protect your most important investment for years to...

Read More

Understanding Delayed Closings and Occupancies Windsor Real Estate

Understanding Delayed Closings and Occupancies for Freehold Homes and Condominiums Page Content Under the delayed closing and delayed occupancy warranty, your builder guarantees that your home will be ready for you to move in either by a date specified in the purchase agreement or by a date that has been properly extended if circumstances occur that delay the home’s completion. In many cases, your builder will be required to compensate you if a delay occurs. For more information about delayed closings and occupancies, including Addendums and Statement of Critical Dates calculators, please see below. Freehold Buyers Delayed Closing Protection To learn more about Delayed Closing protection, click on the link below that corresponds to the signing date of your purchase agreement: • Your purchase agreement was signed on or before June 30, 2008 • Your purchase agreement was signed on or after July 1, 2008 Delayed Closing Addendums If your new freehold home’s purchase agreement was signed on or after July 1, 2008, click on the link below that corresponds to your type of closing to download an addendum: • Freehold Firm Closing Date – Statement of Critical Dates and Addendum • Freehold Tentative Closing Date – Statement of Critical Dates and Addendum However, if project viability conditions are permitted and included in your purchase agreement or the deal is conditional on the sale of the purchaser’s existing home, you must use one of the forms below: • Freehold Firm Closing Date – Statement of Critical Dates and Addendum – Econonic Conditions • Freehold Tentative Closing Date – Statement of Critical Dates and Addendum – Economic Conditions Statement of Critical Dates calculator To create an Addendum with a Statement of Critical Dates, click on the link below: • Statement of Critical Dates calculator for freehold homes To view or download a Statement of Critical Dates paper calendar, click on the link below: • Freehold Tentative Critical Dates Paper Calculator – July 2010 to Dec. 2016 Condominium Buyers Delayed Occupancy Protection To learn more about Delayed Occupancy protection, click on the link below that corresponds to the signing date of your purchase agreement: • The purchase agreement for the first unit sold in your condominium project or phase was signed on or before June 30, 2008 (Ask your builder to provide this information to you.) • The purchase agreement for the first unit sold in your condominium project or phase was signed on or after July 1, 2008 (Ask your builder to provide this information to you.) Delayed Occupancy Addendums If the purchase agreement for the first unit sold in your condominium project or phase was signed on or after July 1, 2008, click on the link below that corresponds...

Read More

Tarion New Home Warranty Protection Windsor Real Estate

This section is intended to help new homeowners understand what’s included in the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act (the Act) and what to do if a warranty problem arises. The Act outlines the warranty coverage that builders are required to provide to their customers.  Coverage under the Act includes deposit protection, protection against defects in work and materials, protection against unauthorized substitutions, and protection against delayed closings or delayed occupancies without proper notice. For condominiums, warranty coverage also includes common/shared areas of the building. The aggregate maximum warranty coverage for new homes and condominium units is $300,000*. The maximum coverage for condominium common elements is $50,000 times the number of units, to a maximum of $2.5 million. Most issues related to the Statutory Warranty are resolved between builders and owners without the intervention of Tarion. When necessary, Tarion will help homeowners and builders interpret the limits of the Act, and will intercede to protect consumers when builders fail to honour warranty obligations. * Tarion increased the aggregate maximum warranty coverage provided under the One Year, Two Year and Major Structural Defect warranties to $300,000 for homes with a date of possession on or after July 1, 2006. This increased coverage amount applies regardless of when the purchase agreements or construction contracts in issue were entered into. If the date of possession of a home is prior to July 1, 2006, the warranty coverage under the One Year, Two Year and Major Structural Defect warranties will continue to be as follows: a) $100,000 if the purchase agreement or construction contract for the home was entered into before September 1, 2004; and b) $150,000 if the purchase agreement or construction contract for the home was entered into on or after September 1,...

Read More

Windsor Essex Property Tax Rebates For Commercial and Industrial Buildings

Windsor Essex property tax relief for vacant commercial and industrial buildings will be provided to property owners through rebates that are issued by municipalities. APPLICATION FORMS WINDSOR ESSEX TECUMSEH LEAMINGTON LAKESHORE LASALLE – contact municipality AMHERSTBURG ONTARIO STANDARD FORM Windsor Essex REBATE: types of properties that are eligible for rebates, the application procedures, the method for calculating rebates, appeal mechanisms, and key deadlines. WINDSOR ESSEX PROPERTY THAT IS ELIGIBLE FOR A REBATE To be eligible for a rebate, a building or portion of a building must satisfy the conditions described below. Buildings that are Entirely Vacant A whole commercial or industrial building will be eligible for a rebate if the entire building was unused for at least 90 consecutive days. Buildings that are Partially Vacant A suite or unit within a commercial building will be eligible for a rebate if, for at least 90 consecutive days, it was: unused; and clearly delineated or physically separated from the used portions of the building; and either capable of being leased for immediate occupation, or not capable of being leased for immediate occupation because it was undergoing or in need of repairs or renovations or was unfit for occupation. A portion of an industrial building will be eligible for a rebate if, for at least 90 consecutive days, it was: unused; and clearly delineated or physically separated from the used portions of the building. Exclusions Seasonal Property: Businesses that operate on a seasonal basis are not eligible for a rebate for the seasons they are closed. Leased Property: Buildings or portions of buildings that are vacant but are leased to a tenant are not eligible for a rebate. Vacant Land Sub-Class: Buildings that are included in a vacant land sub-class (e.g. new buildings that have never been occupied) are not eligible for a rebate. WINDSOR ESSEX APPLICATIONS — CONTENTS AND PROCEDURES Property owners (or their authorized representatives) must submit an application to their local municipality in order to receive a rebate. Application forms may be obtained from local municipal offices. Deadline for Submitting Applications The deadline to submit applications for a tax year is February 28 of the following year. (For example, for the 2001 tax year, the deadline to submit applications is February 28, 2002.) However, if a property owner receives a notice of omitted assessment from the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (MPAC) after a tax year, the deadline to submit an application for a rebate is 90 days after the date of issuance of the notice of omitted assessment. Number of Applications Property owners may submit a maximum of two applications per property per year. Specifically, they may submit either: one application in respect of all vacancies that occurred on...

Read More